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Mind-blowing Minneapolis Zillow listing uses only fisheye lens photos

Three bedrooms. Two bathrooms. Sick as hell.

Three bedrooms. Two bathrooms. Sick as hell. Zillow

Coronavirus, unemployment, and a surge in home building may change things, but at the moment, competition is pretty damn stiff in the Twin Cities housing market. If you’re selling, you’ve got to find a way to stand out.

And, to its credit, this Zillow post that appeared online last week definitely achieves that goal.

It’s a listing for a $230,000 house by Minneapolis’ Jordan neighborhood – three bedrooms, two bathrooms, built in 1905. Seems like a nice place, but none of that info was what caught viewers’ attention.

It was the fact that every single goddamn photo of the place was taken through a fisheye lens.

Three bedrooms. Two bathrooms. Sick as hell.

Three bedrooms. Two bathrooms. Sick as hell. Zillow

Every other straight-on shot on Zillow looks like a total snooze-fest when you feast your eyes on each bulging, high-octane shot of this house. Nothing grabs the attention quite like feeling as if you’re in a super fly music video. Or high as fuck. Or literally just a fish looking at the wonders of the surface world through your li’l fish eyes.

Zillow

Zillow

At least, Twitter thought so.

The agent showing the house – who asked to remain anonymous – says he and the photographer opted for the fisheye lens simply because they wanted to show as much of a room as possible in a single shot – give the viewer a little more visual context. They’ve used it in some of their other listings, and “people seem to like it.”

Zillow

Zillow

No, he says. No one has asked him about this before.

If you’re interested, this sickass house, with its “beautiful front porch,” “recently refinished hardwoods,” and super fly fisheye photo presence could be yours for about $1,127 a month.