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Recommended

The Bluest Eye

Every Thu., Fri., and Sat. from April 15-May 20
7:30 p.m.
Every Sat. from April 29-May 20
1 p.m.
Every Tue. and Wed. from April 18-19
7:30 p.m.
Every Sun. from April 23-30
1 p.m.
April 23
7 p.m.
April 25
10:30 a.m.
April 26
1 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.
Every Tue. and Wed. from May 2-17
7:30 p.m.
May 10
1 p.m.
May 4
10:30 a.m.
Every Sun. from May 7-21
7 p.m.
$15-$77
Theater

Though beauty is said to be in the eye of the beholder, racism has a knack for impairing otherwise perfect vision, distorting reality to fit the most atrocious beliefs. Sadder yet is the notion that victims have no recourse. Such is the dilemma faced by Pecola Breedlove, an 11-year-old black girl struggling to grow up amid the virulent racial animosity of 1940s Ohio in Toni Morrison’s debut novel, The Bluest Eye. Pecola’s desperate wish to be granted eyes blue enough to dispel the hatred of the surrounding world is a heartbreakingly earnest hope, but does not offer any solutions to the social debasement imposed upon her community or the harrowing abuse endured in her fractious home. Detailing these conditions with an intimate understanding, Morrison wrote her novel as an impressionistic tragedy presented from myriad perspectives. Retaining the spirit of Morrison’s original vision, playwright Lydia R. Diamond adapted the piece to encompass outside inequities and internal suffering, bringing to life a poignantly rendered coming-of-age story that retains the singular voice of Morrison’s richly evocative text. Featuring the Guthrie debut of director Lileana Blain-Cruz, The Bluest Eye provides a timely perspective on how racism can poison an entire society’s sense of self-worth.


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