Look how frickin' good Michael Floyd was at Cretin-Derham Hall [VIDEO]

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Even when Michael Floyd looked like a kid, he played like a man.

Michael Floyd finished off last season, improbably, with the New England Patriots.

He caught a few passes, ran some decoy routes, threw a few blocks, and won a Super Bowl -- though he did not actually make the field in that game.

The Patriots had scooped up Floyd after he was cut by the Arizona Cardinals, who quickly cut Floyd last fall December, after the wide receiver's very bad DWI arrest in Phoenix. Floyd was found passed out at the wheel, at an intersection, and later found to have a .217 blood alcohol level. 

In February, a couple weeks after the Super Bowl, Floyd was sentenced to 24 days in jail and three-plus months on home arrest for the DWI, his second conviction. 

After his mercenary stint with the Patriots (and the legal system), Floyd was an unrestricted free agent. Now, he's coming home. 

The St. Paul native signed with the Minnesota Vikings on Wednesday, on a one-year, $1.5 million deal, though NFL.com reports the contract's loaded with incentives that could earn Floyd as much as $6 million. In a statement, Vikings general manager Rick Spielman says Floyd has "accepted full responsibility and is taking encouraging steps to improve" his off-field behavior.

When Floyd might be behaving on-field again remains to be seen: Floyd faces a suspension of two or more games to start the 2017-18 season, with his fate almost entirely in the hands of NFL commissioner Roger Goodell. 

Is this even worth all the risk?

Twin Cities football junkies with long memories might think so. Back when he played for Cretin-Derham Hall, Floyd was a star, one of the top-ranked wide receivers in the whole country. 

After a good college career at Notre Dame, Floyd was a solid-to-exceptional second option in Arizona behind another Twin Cities native, Larry Fitzgerald.

Where (and if) he'll fit into Teddy Bridgewater's/Sam Bradford's Vikings receiver corps is unclear. Floyd's big, strong, can catch, can run, and runs people over. Just watch these videos below, and remember he was a teenager then. So was everyone he's playing against. The difference is, they played like it. 


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